ChriStylezz Speaks on How He Got Started in Event Hosting, The Effectiveness of Social Media, The D’usse Palooza Family, What’s Keeping Him Motivated and More.

There are many words, phrases, and titles that have been getting tossed around very loosely the last couple of years and I’m more than positive I’m not the only person who thought it was weird. Words like “curator” and “vibes” were not words that people were using but ever since the major shift in how our culture is perceived as well as the major shift in how social media has changed the world and the way we view things, some people have created a whole new wave while others just continue to just ride that wave. More specifically, professions like an event host was not a “bread and butter” grind that many thought would make a lot of people rich and/or famous but in 2018, the event host is the new face of any party and/or function. Much like the DJ, today’s event host has the full-on responsibility of carrying the party and making sure that the entire ship runs as smoothly as possible while also doing little things to keep the attendees in tune and more importantly, keeping them entertained. I’ve come across a lot of event hosts but the name ChriStylezz has become synonymous with fun, entertainment and good times.

By using his energy, outgoing personality, comedic humor amongst other things, ChriStylezz has shown how one can emerge from hosting parties for his alma mater, Old Westbury to becoming one of the most highly recommended hosts out there. But, in doing so, emphasizing the fact that you can do it just by being yourself 100% of the time. From hosting Palooza parties alongside acts like Nipsey Hussle, YG, Wale, Swizz Beatz, Chance The Rapper, Cam’ron, Ja Rule and more, the young phenom continues to embody what it means to work hard, work smart, and dedicate yourself by constantly learning and growing your passion.

I had the chance to talk to ChriStylezz about his hosting come up, why he decided to get into event hosting, his popular Trappin Anonymous Podcast, working with the D’usse Palooza family, his current motivational factors and much more in our full interview below.

1 – How did you get started in event hosting?

Well, with the hosting it started off through my fraternity. I had my own PR company when I was college as well. The first thing I told people when I crossed was I was going to travel. I told them I was gonna get up, go out and meet people. I wanted to network. I wanted to see what was really good out here. I wanted to know my network. I wanted to know who else was in the fraternity that I could bounce ideas off of and just make shit happen. That was the first thing I did and from there I was just road tripping. I remember calling this dude I was like “Yo, my name is Chris. I just crossed over at Old Westbury. I’m coming to your campus and I want to see if this frat is what everybody says it is.” He was telling me not to worry about it. I never met this kid a day in my life. Some chick was telling me that this dude was running the campus. This dude didn’t know me from a hole in the wall and he just embraced me. We went out and we was just kicking it. From there we came up with this lil event where we would go up and down the east coast and just throw events and host them. We was the Kappas shimmying in the parties. I was telling him we gotta do more. We can’t just be the Kappas shimmying, I wanted a tangible talent. We had DJ’s and promoters and all these people built around us but what is it that we do? I had asked a DJ at one of our events like “Yo, you think I could fuck with this mic shit real quick?” He was like yeah. He checked the levels and shit and told me I could feel it out and see if I like it. When I was talking to the crowd they was responding and I was like “Oh, shit!”

2 – It seems like you’ve always had a knack for making people laugh. I thought you were a social media personality. Do you consider yourself that as well?

I always been the kind of dude that walked in the room and by the time I left everybody was like “Yo, who was that kid?” I’ve always been that guy. My personality has always been that electric when it came to entering different rooms. I actually want to do comedy one day. I wanna get on a fucking stage and tell jokes. I wanna do that before I die. I’ve always been this type of charismatic person, you know. I never considered myself like “Instagram” funny. I’m in-person funny. Like, if you’re around me I can definitely make you laugh. I don’t know if I can sit there and create skits and shit all day long. That’s not really where my knack is. Not to limit myself and say I can’t but I don’t know if that’s what I want to do. I’m more about cultivating my talent and craft as an event host and just finding a space within that. But, I’ve always been lively. I’ve always had mad jokes. I was the kid that was cutting niggas ass and getting niggas in they feelings. I was mad problematic. I always knew how to get under people skin and always knew what to say. It just translates well on social media. I wouldn’t even consider myself a social media personality per say just because it’s not something I work at. When funny things come up I might post that or if I get a funny idea I may post that.

3 – In your opinion, what makes a great event host?

Originality, man. Just being able to be innovative. Being able to capture the crowd and capture the moments that don’t seem typical or things that people aren’t expecting. Being able to do those things are what make a great host. Pretty much not sticking to the script and not doing a bunch of shit that you see everybody else do. To me, there was no formula of how to be a host. It was just a formula of how to be Chris. So, I’ve always been me on that stage and me being me just translated well on the stage. I’m really that hype person and that dancing person. I think that’s the best part of it because it doesn’t look like I’m trying or forcing it. It doesn’t look like I’m trying to be in a space where i don’t belong. Having those ways to be you and still stick to the job, still make people laugh and have fun, interacting with the crowd and so on. All of those things are intertwined.

4 – I remember listening to your podcast Trappin Anonymous when you first introduced it. The inspiration behind it seems pretty evident but talk about that a little bit. What made you want to showcase these stories?

Well, Trappin Anonymous is like my baby. That’s my life’s work. Trapping Anonymous is just gonna live on forever because it’s just good work. It’s very natural. It’s very hands on. It’s at the very ground level of the culture. It’s not a bunch of celebrities on there. It’s not about me seeing if I could get a wild moment out of somebody else. This is just someone’s story coming from everyday people. Everyone has a story. This is me getting their story and having those conversations. To be honest, people are interesting and at some point, everyone wants to tell some part of their story. I don’t care who you are. I was kind of forced into this space to create something that was my own. I didn’t just want to be the Palooza host or just the guy dancing on stage. I wanted to be known for something else that I can create. I’m a creative. I create shit. That’s always been me. Just the circle that I’m around, it’s like a hub for talent. We got people that do video, people that take great pictures, we got people that are on tv, one doing radio and so on. It’s like what else do you do my man? So, I had to create something more. They say you hang around 8 millionaires you’ll be the 9th one because by mistake my ambition is gonna rub off on you. That drive and that want to become better is gonna rub off on you and that’s exactly what happened. I didn’t even know if I wanted to host anymore. I just wanted to become more and become better. But, I’ve always been fascinated with the underworld. I love scam, I love crime, I love people stealing and shit. I’m fascinated with people who live or have lived that type of lifestyle.

5 – The podcast world seems somewhat competitive cause everyone is doing one. Why do you believe Trappin Anonymous received the recognition and high praise that it did upon the launch of it?

It’s something that no one has ever done within the podcast world. It’s like people are doing some of the same things like current events, hip-hop media, some talk about other topics like relationships and sex and a bunch of shit. Everyone has a podcast. Trappin Anonymous is episodic. It’s not like every week you’re gonna get a new episode. It’s like this is gonna come out and when it does it’s gonna be very different and very fresh. It was intended to be something that you’ve never heard before. At first, people were like they were gonna listen to it cause the idea was so fire and then it turned into oh shit, this is actually good. It’s starting conversations and it’s becoming something more. The mystery of it was dope but then to top it off the content was actually good. 200,000 to 300,000 plays later it’s something that people can always come back to.

6 – You use social media as your own personal playground. Multiple photos and videos of you have gone viral. In your opinion, why do you think it’s important for one to utilize social media to build their brand?

Well, first things first it’s me being me. Like I said before, when I’m creating content or when I post shit it’s not like “Yo, I’m a do this skit and post it on social media.” All of this shit you see is really my life. I don’t be at parties like “Hey, let’s dance and post it on social media to see how many likes we can get.” People are catching me in real life moments and I think that’s why those things go viral. It’s pure fun and it feels good. When people look at me or think about me, I want them to feel that good time or good vibe. It’s the same thing as hosting. I’m not reading off of a script. I’m being me. You’ll like me for it, you’ll love me for it or you’ll hate me for it but where you are with it, it’s fine. But, at the core of it, this is ChriStylezz. This is who I am. On social media people just eat it up. People wanna laugh and have a good time. It’s super important for my personal brand cause I wanna do shows, I want people to book me and do other things. The more attention that I can get the more room that I have to do those creative things.

Why did y'all do this to me?!?! 😭😭😭 #christylezzwiththedancemoves #christylezz

A post shared by LEGEND (@christylezz) on

7 – It’s safe to say that at this point a lot of people know you from the Paloozas. But, how did you manage to get link up with Kam?

Well, here’s the thing with Kam… I don’t know if it was more about what he saw in me or him trying to get me to see something within myself. He said “Yo, you’re saying you can do this, that and this. You’re saying you want to transform this, that and this. Come to me with a plan and verbalize it. If it’s in the capacity for me to do it then I’ll do whatever in my power to make it happen. If I can’t then I can’t.” Then, I came to him with a plan. It just happens that we were able to execute it well but it was like, it was very honest conversation that we would always have. I remember one of the Henny Palooza’s I was suppose to be hosting and I was like “Ight, when’s my turn. Let me get on” He’s telling me five more minutes and he got me. Five minutes pass. I’m asking if it’s my time yet. He keep telling me he got me. It got to the point where I didn’t even feel I was getting on and I’m sitting there like yo, what the fuck. We had a conversation but at the end of the day, what you gonna do? You gotta earn your space, bro. You gotta earn that light, bro. There are so many people are out there and I can’t even remember they names. You know why? Cause they not here, bro. I say that to say it’s not about what he seen in me. I had to see it in myself. I had to get there but I still had to carve a path once I got there. It wasn’t just like “Ok, here it is.” When i got the point of ok, here it is… that’s when the real work began. I had to really find that fire within me so that I can create a lane within this on my own. Kam was just like “Ight, I opened the door. Go ahead.” Shit felt like post-grad like “Ok, here’s the real world.” haha.

8 – You guys have done so many parties in other cities, states and even islands. In your opinion, what makes a great event? Secondly, how does one stand out amongst a group of amazing talents such as the D’usse Palooza family?

What makes a good event really comes down to what makes a good host. It’s really the originality, bro. It’s bringing something fresh and new. It’s challenging the norm. You really gotta go against that. Take D’usse Palooza for example. We eliminated the V.I.P. You can’t go in there and have a bottle. you can’t go in there and have a section. You can’t go in there and feel like you’re above anyone else. You gotta go in there and feel like you’re on the same level as everyone else. That went against party culture in the city. The city is known for the bottles, the sections, the lights and all that shit. The dressing up and the heels and all that shit. People come through in sweats, jeans, sneakers on some hanging out shit. It completely went against the grain. Why was Trappin Anonymous so big? Cause it talked about those things. It challenged what podcasts really were at that time. There was no real storytelling. It was just banter. But again, a great event is something that challenges the norm. The DJ is the most important part to any party. They carry it out and make sure the music is good and the party is flowing. That has to be coupled with the good idea. Now, you see these themed parties and you see these people are doing this type of party which is great cause they’re trying to find their way in the mix as well. But, there’s gonna come a time when this becomes the saturated place. Then, people are going to have to find something else. People are always going to be forced to challenge the norm and create. As for me standing out in my family, it comes to me being the best at what I do. To me, it’s not hard because this is like a place where only the best survive. I’m not here by mistake or here to be someone else. I think Karl is the best videographer in the city. I think Peej makes the best graphics and flyers. I think Ravie B takes the best pictures. I humbly believe that these people are the best in the business. They way you stay afloat is by constantly reinventing yourself and becoming better. I be up there DJ’ing sometimes. I’m pushing the envelop. I’m learning new crafts that I didn’t even know I would have the skills to cultivate. You gotta stay hungry, bro. You gotta always know that you could never get to a point where you can just stop and become lazy or creating or pushing the envelop.

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9 – From all the parties that the team has done, is there one that comes to mind that didn’t turn out the way you guys thought it would? Which party would you say was the best? Why?

Of course, bro. There are some parties that have happened where I say to myself this shit was terrible or a bunch of things that could’ve been done better. Maybe more planning. Just a ton of shit. There are times where we’ve sat around after the party was over and said to one another “This shit was not it.” But, with every party, we’re constantly reminded of why we’re in the space that we’re in. Then, you’ll have these great moments like the party in L.A. or the one in NYC when we’re all just like wow, we can do this shit forever. I know niggas be watching like “Damn when these niggas gonna fail?” I probably would feel the same way. But, we not here by mistake, bro. This shit wasn’t no lotto ticket. We are literally the best at what we do. This is the only space for us.

10 – In your opinion, why do you think D’usse Palooza has become so important to the party/event space in today’s culture?

Every era has that “thing.” Our parents had like The Tunnel, you hear Funk Flex and Mister Cee and Clark Kent talk about all the time. Like, every era had something that people would be like “yo, this is the shit!” You think about Elks, Empire and so on. Every era has that thing and as of now, we’re blessed to be that thing for our era. Not to mention, every party feels new. We stay on our toes and we try to think of ways to make it better, you know. And sometimes simplicity is just it. It’s not about going all out for no reason. It’s mostly about keeping it right where it’s at for a good time, bro. Niggas ain’t in there tryna fight or shoot the shit up. You can’t put a price on that I don’t care how much the ticket cost. It’s just a really good time. Everybody coming through to vibe. It really was a social media event. It’s probably one of the only parties you’ve seen grow over time because of social media.

11 – I’ve been following you for a while and over the years you’ve gotten better and better at your craft. What keeps you motivated to keep going?

Well, one is the team. Just watching the team and watching everybody win makes you want to win. Also, becoming content. Not wanting more. The feeling of not wanting to do something extraordinary. The idea of more, more, more creates a very unhappy place because now that more becomes your validation. That more becomes you saying “I’m gonna be happy when x,y,z happens.” That pretty much suggests that you’re not happy now and we can’t have that. So, now we’re putting pressure on ourselves to constantly create and constantly do this, that and the third and we’re sad. But then it always turns out to be like “Yo, when I get this I’m a be good.” No, because when you finally get that, it’s going to be something else that you gotta get. That’s part of the problem. For me, it’s like if that “if” never happens or that “when” never comes, what happens now? That something that you place validation over your happiness for now consoles whether you’re happy or not. What if you never reach that point? What if takes 2-3 years? So, now you gotta live depressed cause you wasn’t able to reach that? Nah. What we gotta do is learn how to be happy through growth and we gonna enjoy that space that we’re in right now. We gonna celebrate those wins right now. Then, we gonna continue to get to it. But, we’re not gonna focus on or put all of our emphasis on where we gotta be because that can’t continue to control our emotions and our present state.

12 – What’s the biggest piece of advice anyone has ever given you?

Don’t care. My first show at Old Westbury. I asked the guy backstage who was hosting before me like “how do you do this shit?!” Public speaking is already trash. That shit is mad scary. He dead ass told me like “yo, Stylezz you can’t care.” I said what? He said “you can’t care, bro.” Now, I’m thinking if I trip and I run backstage I’m a laughing stock but if I trip and say some shit like “yo, what the hell is wrong with these floors? Somebody come fix this shit” it becomes a joke. I am in control the entire time. I’m so worried about whatever everybody else is thinking that I’m unable to do whatI’m called here to do. Why am I caring? People don’t even care that much. As much as everybody think they got haters and people hating, people don’t give a damn. Something gonna happen to you, the timeline gonna talk about it for a couple hours and then something gonna happen to somebody else, bro. How can I let your opinion control everything that I’m doing? How? How can I do that to myself? I don’t care bro. When you see me post stuff it’s because I watched it 50 times and I laughed 50 times because i think it’s funny. I think it’s hilarious. People probably sit up there like this nigga is corny. Bro, it’s not about you. People will love you for it though because they’re honestly afraid to be themselves. I just don’t care, bro.

13 – What’s next for ChriStylezz? What can your fans expect from you for 2018?

We talking equity now. We talking more ownership. Whether that’s living, events and so on. You can’t just pay me to be a host anymore. How can I get equity in your event? You can’t just give me a check to go do something. How can I become a part of whatever it is you’re doing and see the money that you’re making? That’s the mind-boggling thing. I’m not gonna keep doing this and hosting and you got people DJ’ing events… the real question is how much money are you making to where you can pay out this amount of money? You would never ever go back to that side of the business. So, now we’re talking about making money off the backend and the front end. We need both bags. It’s creating more content but aligning myself with bigger platforms so we can make shit bigger and reach more people. We still staying on top of the content we’re putting out and building up the social media. Still hosting, doing the most’n and just enjoying myself bro. I’m just gonna continue to have fun in the space that I’ve earned and busted my ass for.

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