Jay Holz Speaks on Music Management and Public Relations, How He Got into Journalism, Expanding His Positive Vibe Ent. Brand, and Much More.

The behind the scenes aspect of the music industry is one business that helps mold an individual for bigger and better things. If you are able to maneuver and finesse the way one should in regards to building up a great contact list as well as gaining as much knowledge as possible, you’ll be setting yourself up for success in the long run when it comes to any future endeavors. Also, just having a basic understanding of how the industry works is always a huge plus. I met Jay Holz about a year ago during a panel series and his name was one that constantly came up on my social media when it came to music related topics and inside stories related to the industry.

Jay formerly held a position as the Managing Editor for Karen Civil’s website but recently parted ways with them to focus on his own brand, Positive Vibe Ent., a management, marketing and PR company structured to help emerging artists.

I had the opportunity to catch up with Jay to talk about Positive Vibe Ent., the main goal for expanding the brand, his take on journalism and what he considers a good PR person and music manager. Check out our full interview below.

1 – What inspired you to be a part of the music industry?

Ever since I was a young kid, I always looked up to entertainers and athletes and I think it just stuck with me my whole life. By the time I was ready to graduate high school and go to college, a lot of rappers were coming up through the Internet and you could start to see how all of the success was happening. I watched people like Will Dzombak (Wiz’s manager) and Quentin Cuff (Mac Miller’s business partner) be so important to Wiz and Mac’s success that I thought, ‘Shit, I can do this too!’

2 – How did you get involved in the industry?

It all started in 2009/2010 when I met my brother Malik Ferraud (@MalikFerraud). At the time, he was going by the rap name Money and he and his old crew had a song called “B4LT1M0RE” that was really popular in the city. I instantly became a fan and started reaching out to him. We met in Ocean City, MD in the summer of 2010 and we connected right away. We put in work! From there, I started to network with a ton of different people in the industry and the rest is kind of history. Malik and I are still working together till this day, as well as our other day 1 homies Donate Benjamin (@TaysWorld410) and Charlie Peacher (@CharliePeacher).

3 – I know you previously worked as the Managing Editor for Karen Civil’s website. What made you want to get into journalism? Was that something you always wanted to do?

To keep it 100 with you….I never had a true passion for journalism. I just knew that if I could get some type of job/position in the industry, I could eventually build up a nice network and get back to my management/PR roots, which was always my long-term goal. That being said, once I got into the journalism game, I started to really love it. In 2012, my good friend Sermon gave me a chance of a lifetime and allowed me to start writing for his site — with literally 0 experience. A year later, after Sermon taught me a bunch of stuff, I landed a job with HipHop-N-More, thanks to the blog gawd Navjosh. He turned me into a blog monster. Then of course in 2014, I started working for Karen Civil as a contributor. A year later, I was the managing editor for the site and serving as her number 2. We did some amazing things together. Forever appreciative of her allowing me to grow and accomplish some bucket list items of mine. Major shout out to Niki McGloster for believing in me, and to my team Shawn Grant, Ayanna Sinclair, Alley Olivier, Lindsey India, Keith Reid-Cleveland, Kia Imani, Lupe Llerenas, Travis Grier, Michelle Locke, Pennie, Micia and anyone else I forgot.

4 – You’re currently running your own business, Positive Vibe Ent, which is a management and PR company. What inspired you to launch this business?

They say it’s not as fun working for someone else, so I decided to work for me! After I quit my job with the Baltimore Orioles in 2016 (thank god I did that, by the way), I was ready to start a company and get back to managing and doing PR/marketing full time. Wallah, Positive Vibe Entertainment was born. I owe a big thanks to Malik and Dontae for coming up with the idea/concept behind PV a long time ago. And I give myself thanks for bringing it to life.

5 – What is Positive Vibe Ent’s main objective?

Our main goal is to help launch careers for our clients and spread positive energy to the world in the process. The nuts and bolts of our business are Management, PR, Marketing, and Consulting, however, I want PV to grow into its own platform that promotes positivity every day. We’ll be creating empowering content via our website and social media accounts, releasing thoughtful merchandise, hosting events, and much further down the line. I gotta get my baby off the ground before we can take over. We will though!

6 – In your opinion, what do you think makes a good PR person? What do you think makes a good music manager?

Consistency, timeliness and the willingness to do whatever for your clients. That goes for both PR and management. Being a good PR person entails having great networking and communication skills, and always being up-to-date on the trends of whatever industry you’re doing PR in. As for management, you have to have an enormous amount of patience, great negotiation skills, confidence and most importantly, the ability to see the bigger picture.

7 – You’re also the road manager for rising act Tate Kobang. How did you land that position?

That’s my dawg! Shout out to Tate and shout out to our big homie Shawn Caesar. Shawn runs DTLR + DTLR Radio and at the beginning of 2017, he started working closely with Tate. They were gearing up to drop Tate’s mixtape Silent Waves (hosted by DJ Flow) around that time and they wanted to bring me on to do PR for it. From there, Tate, Shawn and I got extremely close and I started doing more than just PR for Tate. As we were all progressing and making moves, we realized he needed a day-to-day road manager and it just made sense for me to take that role. To be honest, though, I don’t look at Tate as a “client”. That’s my brother and I’ll go to war for him.

8 – What struggles did you face and/or still going through as you make your way through this industry?

The oversaturation makes it tough to break through and a lot of the corny/goofy behavior from the industry as of late makes it hard to stay motivated sometimes. That being said, my dreams and goals are sky high, so whenever I have that down moment, I just think about why I’m doing this in the first place, and then I quickly snap out of it. Positive Vibe, ya dig?

9 – What are you currently using as your source of inspiration?

My clients, my city, my family. Everything around me inspires me. Seeing different parts of the country and the world, meeting different people, etc. If you allow yourself to, you can find inspiration almost anywhere.

10 – What type of advice would you give to the aspiring business owner, publicist, and music manager?

Never ever give up. Remove the words, “can’t” and “won’t” from your vocabulary. Always remember your “why” and your purpose in life. And the biggest piece of advice that I give to every single person I meet is to make happiness your number 1 priority. There is not one thing more important in this world than finding happiness and peace. Make that your top goal every day, and you can’t possibly lose.

11 – What’s next for Jay Holz for the second half of 2018? What can we expect from Positive Vibe Ent as well as the acts you’re managing?

I have some exciting things I’m working on for the rest of the year. One of which is another showcase in Baltimore to follow up my one from last year. I’ll be launching PV’s website very very soon. You’re going to see a bunch of great content, partnerships and overall excitement from the likes of Da Kid Gowie, Tate Kobang, Young Money Yawn, Malik Ferraud, Charlie Peacher, Dontae Benjamin, Tracksmith, my Swisher Sweets family and much more. Most importantly, you can expect a boatload of positive energy for as long as I’m breathing.

Billboard’s Associate Editor Bianca Gracie Speaks on Writing Inspirations, What Makes A Great Music Journalist, Landing Her Position at Billboard, Tips for the Emerging Journalist and More.

Being a journalist or just a writer in general is difficult at times because it’s not easy providing exciting news or any type of content for your audience. Writing is a challenging profession and despite having to be grammatically trained to put a full length article together based on opening statements, transitions, supporting details and such, just being able to find your own voice and display that within words is a challenge on its own. Some writers have a hard time adjusting to this but the ones who find that voice are normally the ones who end up exceeding all expectations within the writing space. Bianca Gracie didn’t only find her voice throughout her years of writing and creating digital content but is now displaying that voice and talent on the biggest music platform in the world – Billboard.

I had the chance to catch up with Bianca to take about her come up in journalism, her journalistic inspirations, her struggles with deadlines, how she landed her Associate Editor position over at Billboard and much more in our full interview below.

1 – How did you get into journalism?

Well, I’ve always loved writing and reading books since I was a kid, and I later began to write poetry in high school and college. Some of it got published but I knew I couldn’t make a living off poems. So I picked up a journalism minor in college to see if I’d like it, and that’s when my passion for it really blossomed. My program required students to take two six-month internships before graduating, and one of my internships was for a pop website called Idolator. This was back in 2013. That was my first taste of the music industry and I was able to not only work on my writing but to interview people as well. I kept that connection once my internship was finished, and the rest is history!

2 – What would you say was your main source of inspiration to get into music journalism?

Not many people know this, but I actually wanted to work in fashion. But after a few internships and freelance jobs, I realized that industry was too fickle for me. I always loved music — specifically dancehall and pop — and I grew up with a lot of DJs in my family, which I’d say was my biggest inspiration. So the passion for it was always there. I kind of had a wake-up call after leaving the fashion world and was like, “Hey, why don’t I try this music thing out?”

3 – When did you realize that music journalism was something you could actually make a career out of?

That lightbulb moment occurred once I got the internship at Idolator, and I continued to work with them afterward as a freelancer and later as their editorial assistant for two years. At the time, I thought it was incredible that the people around me had a career that could also be so much fun.

4 – Do you remember the first article you did that contributed to your come up?

Man, I have to go back to the archives for this one! Many people who follow my work are aware of my love for ‘90s and ‘00s nostalgia and I began crafting that niche really early. I remember writing long-form articles for the 10th anniversary of Jay-Z’s The Black Album and the 15th anniversary of TLC’s Fanmail. Social media wasn’t as wildly significant at the time, but those kinds of articles received a lot of love from the right people — the fans and other industry folks. I think they helped prove that I could be a beast in the writing game if I really wanted to! [laughs]

5 – In your opinion, aside from being a music connoisseur, what else makes a great writer/music journalist?

One of the biggest parts of the music industry are the fanbases, so for me, it’s always been important for me to keep my ear close to what they’re listening and thinking. It’s also key to read beyond your own work. You can learn so much from other journalists both through their writing and also making direct connections with them. Honestly, just reading in general: the newspaper, song lyrics, music history books, essays from professors…everything.

6 – You’ve done a lot of different types of writing so far but which type of article do you prefer – interviews, op-ed’s, daily news articles? Why?

I love to talk my shit in think pieces here and there, but interviews will forever have my heart. There’s something really special about forming a connection with an artist, record executive or composer — whether it’s just for 15 minutes or an hour. I’ve realized it’s become somewhat of my mission to help tell people’s stories in a genuine way, and interviews are the perfect way to do so.

7 – Talk to us a little bit about your Billboard come up. How did you manage to land a position there as the Associate Editor?

Connections, connections, connections!! I cannot stress enough how important it is to network and maintain a relationship with industry colleagues you meet along the way. So the reason I got my previous job at Fuse is because a fellow writer knew of my work through Twitter and later emailed me about a position there (he was the managing editor at the time). Fast forward two years later, and that same editor (who moved to Billboard a little after I began working at Fuse) hit me up about a Billboard offer about three months ago. If I never kept in contact with him throughout all these years and kept him up to date with my career goals, I don’t think I would’ve gotten this associate editor job so quickly. I’m super thankful.

8 – Working in publication there are always deadlines for an article to go up. Yoh Phillips, a popular music writer that I’m sure you know said “Don’t die for the deadline” in one of his interviews. What are your thoughts on deadlines and the pressures of putting a piece out that’s probably not 100%? Have you ever put something out that you felt was sub-par?

Ughhhh deadlines are the worst! They are very necessary to keep you on top of your game, especially now that I work for a print magazine. But man they can often be a major headache. Deadlines used to give me a lot of anxiety since I love to procrastinate (I still do honestly haha), but I’ve learned to handle my time. But there’s definitely been long-form articles and breaking news stories that I’ve rushed because I was too close to the deadline, so I said “fuck it,” published it and hoped for the best!

9 – There are so many good writers and journalists out there who are putting out great content daily. Aside from the fact that you write for one of the most prominent music platforms in the country, how do you maintain your originality and voice in your writing?

I think because I work for Billboard, there are obviously more eyes on my writing. So I have no choice to stand out. But that doesn’t mean for me to shell out against the grain hot takes just for the hell of it. I’ve always been confident in the way I write, especially since I love nostalgia so much. That right there is my voice, and it’s only gotten stronger. So I use that to my advantage and stick to my quirky thoughts on certain artists and genres, and that hasn’t really failed me yet.

10 – Who are some of the journalists you currently admire? Why?

Wow, there’s so many! A few of my favorites who I think are killing the game are Eve Barlow, Anne Donahue, Yoh Phillips, Craig Jenkins, Da’Shan Smith, Gary Suarez, David Marchese, Ivie Ani, Sharine Taylor…my list goes on! I respect writers who stay true to their voice and don’t stray away from their point of view to float alongside bandwagonists. These guys always bring a fresh perspective to the hot topics in music, some of which are funny, scathing or just an educated read. It definitely inspires me!

11 – What are some tips you would give to the new blogger, aspiring music writer and/or music journalist?

My main advice would be to never forget why you got into this industry in the first place. So many people will try to break you down or attempt to poach your ideas, especially if you’re a double-minority like myself: a Black woman. But your passion and drive will win in the end and is proof that you’re good enough to stick around. Because this industry definitely isn’t always pretty! Please don’t let these listening events and free happy hours or dinners from record labels that you see on popular influencers’ social media fool you. It’s a lot of hard work and long hours. But if your heart is truly in this, then it’ll give you the fuel to stay determined.

12 – What are some tips that have been given to you by your peers in regards to your career?

I was very shy at the beginning of my career, especially when I had to meet celebrities in person. But I’ve learned from my peers to stay professional and to not be afraid to go the extra mile or ask that tough question that you know others won’t. I’ve also been taught to not get too comfortable and to always challenge yourself to become a better writer. That’s helped me to not get caught up in the hype and glitz of the industry, and it’s kept me driven. This is a job, after all.

13 – What can we expect from Bianca Gracie for the rest of 2018?

My goal this year is to publish even more thoughtful, witty profiles and op-eds, so you can look out for that. And I’ve spoken to some really awesome people thus far, so you never know what interview I have up my sleeve next!